Hope & Healing Through Music

In 1633, on his deathbed at the tender age of 39, English poet, George Herbert, a contemporary of William Shakespeare and John Milton, gave his friend a collection of religious poems to take to Nicholas Ferrar, with the instructions: “Tell him, he shall find in it a picture of the many spiritual conflicts that have past betwixt God and my soul, before I could subject mine to the will of Jesus my Master, in whose service I have now found perfect freedom; desire him to read it: and then, if he can think it may turn to the advantage of any dejected poor Soul, let it be made publick: if not, let him burn it: for I and it, are less than the least of God’s mercies.” The collection would go on to an almost unprecedented popularity, for its time. Over 13 editions, and a total publication run of 20,000 copies were printed between 1633 and 1679. Out of this collection, titled “The Temple” comes the poem that will be sung by the choir this Sunday, titled “Let All the World in Every Corner Sing.” The triumphant message of this text implores “the church with psalms must shout, no door can keep them out.” People all over the world long for hope and healing, for a message of grace, hope, and reconciliation. It is this message that is carried by Herbert’s text.

The poem with its original spelling and spacing appears as follows:


Chorus: Let all the world in ev’ry corner sing,
My God and King.
Verse: The heav’ns are not too high,
His praise may thither flie:
The earth is not too low,
His praises there may grow.
Chorus: Let all the world in ev’ry corner sing,
My God and King.
Verse: The church with psalms must shout,
No doore can keep them out:
But above all, the heart
Must bear the longest part.
Chorus: Let all the world in ev’ry corner sing,
My God and King.

Peace,

Mark